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    Department of Corrections Newsletter, May 2013


    Text is image, especially in an organization like the Department of Corrections. We are happy to announce the recent updates and changes this month, with our monthly newsletter!

    This month has been one of great changes. The entire High Command team moved up a spot, with Commissioner Abbruzi taking the title of Honourary Commissioner upon him. However, one thing has not changed and that is our mission to ensure public safety through our initiatives to rehabilitate our convicts. And it is something that we will not stop doing. Another thing that has not changed is our monthly newsletter and so without further chit-chat, I hereby present it to you.

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    From this month onwards, the stars of the Commissioner board have changed hands for Commissioner Abbruzi has laid down his position. With that, I have been entrusted with the department and so, a great deal of responsibility. This month started off quiet until the 19th of May, when the Commissioner's decision was published and he resigned. Therefore, this month's newsletter will feature more about his resignation.

    However, it was not the only thing that happened this month. Just several days ago, we broke not only the DoC record of largest amount of recruits in a single academy, we broke the record of largest academy group all together, the record of largest amount of graduated recruits and not to mention, the record of largest amount of full-time employees within the DoC. We broke four records in a week's time. Without the great contributions of DC Winnfield and Lt Reyna, this would not have been possible.

    I hope to continue this trend of breaking records way into the next month. And I know that I can count on a good team to help me do it.

    Commissioner Galen Hawkins



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    Resignation of a Commissioner
    Written by Commissioner Galen Hawkins
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    Former Commissioner Dexter Abbruzi with newly appointed Commissioner Galen Hawkins, December 2011
    This month has seen the resignation of an icon within the San Andreas Department of Corrections; After fourty years of loyal service to the DoC, Commissioner Dexter Abbruzi has laid down his his position within the department.

    40 years ago, I started working for the Los Santos Prison, as it was called back then, as a Probationary Correctional Officer - the lowest rank of the ranking structure at that time. I worked my way up the ladder like any of you guys, one rank at a time and with nothing else but hard work, dedication, activity and enthusiasm. It didn't take long for myself and two other colleagues to get noticed by the LSP High Command and awards kept coming our way, along with promotions and good words by the highest ones. Adam Williams and Dereck Smith were my colleagues - the latter unfortunately resigned, as the atmosphere was too difficult for him to handle, but Williams as many of you know, later on became Commissioner of the Department of Corrections. [...] With constant dedication and activity I soon got to be a member of the command team, which allowed me to partake in important discussions regarding the future of the DoC. I also believe I got quite important experience at that time, which proved to be rather useful later on, when I became Commissioner. -Abbruzi, 2013

    His work was and still is greatly valued by everyone in the department. Without Commissioner Abbruzi, we would not have the facility we have today. He was personally involved with the planning, construction and finalizing of SACF, every step on the way, occasionally putting a hard hat on himself to direct things on site. We would still be part of the Los Santos Police Department, which Commissioner Abbruzi successfully lobbied to be autonomous from. And those are two of the many things he did; Managed the bulks every month, co-ordinated inter-departmental relations, represented the SADoC in the government, liaised with all other departments, the list goes on. The full list of things we, as a Department owe this man, would be too long to include on a newsletter.

    But in a few days, I will be 60 years old and thus retiring from the position of the Department of Corrections Commissioner. I believe I have given it all in my power and even though at some times it seemed as if I didn't choose the best option there was, my intentions were always in favour of the Department. It is also hard to understand the position of the Commissioner without being one, which I myself acknowledged after being quite a moron to Williams and then experiencing the same as commissioner. It is a hard position, you need to take actions you wouldn't do if it was entirely up to you, you need to look at the bigger picture and sometimes forget about your own ass..there is awfully a lot of work to take care of and it requires COMPLETE dedication and activity. In my 60s, believe me, I can not offer that anymore and after working so hard, I wouldn't want to see the department going downhill because of my incompetence in these years..it is hard to follow and the DoC deserves and needs an active leadership. -Abbruzi, 2013

    But he was not only an efficient and hardworking Commissioner. He was, and still to this day is, a good man. I personally, owe this man more than I could repay him for. There was no problem he wouldn't listen to if someone had it. He worked selflessly for this department. He is the embodiment of the values we stand for; courage, strength, honour, integrity, pride, commitment. He more than once put himself in harms way to get the job done and always did it with great efficiency and honour.

    It has been agreed upon that the new Commissioner becomes current DC Galen Hawkins, and Deputy Commissioner current AC John Winnfield. Assistant Commissioner will be appointed in the next couple of months by the new leadership. -Abbruzi, 2013

    I am truly honoured to have served along with him. But above all, I am honoured that he entrusts me with the department he has now lead for so long. I hope to lead by example, as he has given to me for so long.

    Because I, nor this department will ever be able to truly repay him for his service and all the things he has done for us, it has been decided for him to keep the entitlement of Honourary Commissioner. The least I can do for a man like him. So know that when you see a man in a cabriolet with sunglasses on waving at you, he is the reason we are where we are at this point.

    Correctional Rehabilitation Code
    Written by Communications Officer Amy Johnston

    The month of May saw the re-introduction of the Correctional Rehabilitation Code, also known as the CRC. With the move to the San Andreas Correctional Facility from the Los Santos Prison, the old CRC was scrapped.

    Before the Correctional Rehabilitation Code was re-introduced, there was a major lack of organisation when it came to isolation. Inmates were isolated by CO's and the isolations weren't documented. This was a problem because CO's did not know when to release inmates or what those inmates were in isolation for. Sometimes, an inmate who had stolen something from the canteen would be in isolation for longer than someone who had attempted to murder another inmate. The system required a huge revamp so the High Command team got to work and re-introduced the Correctional Rehabilitation Code.

    When a Correctional Officer isolates an inmate, an isolation form is required to be filled out and submitted. These reports contain the inmates name, the offence that they committed and when the inmate is to be released from department C, the isolation department. When an inmate is ready to be put back into general population, CO's will be notified and one will head over and release the inmate that is ready to be released.

    The new Correctional Rehabilitation Code is fair and efficient. If an inmate commits a crime in prison, they will be put in isolation for the right amount of time. Inmates will be released when they have served an appropriate sentence in isolation. Repeat offenders will often get longer sentences in isolation in hope that they'll learn something from their mistakes. The documentation also lets us see how an inmate is behaving in SACF. For example, if an inmate requests parole, a parole officer can take a quick look at that inmates isolation records and see if they are fit for parole, on top of other factors. It is fair because inmates who only commit a small offence such as vandalism will no longer spend the same amount of time in isolation as someone who has murdered another inmate.

    At the time this article was written, 332 isolation forms have been submitted and an average of twelve are submitted each day. The most common charge on isolation reports is Assault and Battery.

    DoC supplies for CITY
    Written by Commissioner Galen Hawkins

    As everyone undoubtedly knows, on the 17th of May, San Andreas was struck by a major hurricane causing a great amount of damage to the city of Los Santos.

    As Emergency services were overwhelmed by the massive wave of 911 calls, the men and women of the SASD, LSPD and LSFD nonetheless braved the weather to help the victims of the storm. We, the DoC, couldn't just sit idle and listen to the radio chatter. Even though the storm did hit our facility, we had next to no damage by it.

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    The decision was made to assist the government officials, who were in desperate need of supplies at City Hall. As the DoC gets supplies for a large amount of inmates, resources were diverted to the city and along with several LSFD trucks, arrived minutes later to the relieve of medical personnel inside.

    The DoC thanks the officers, deputies, firefighters, paramedics and citizens that selflessly braved the weather in order to care for all others. Our hearts go out towards those that lost their lives in the severe storm.



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    The Training and Recruitment sub-department of the San Andreas Department of Corrections is happy to announce that Academy #28 has successfully finished recently. By far the biggest succesful recruitment drive in terms of accepted recruits in the department's history, #28 was started with high expectations, and did not even remotely disappoint. In total, 55 applications were received, out of which 35 were accepted. After the evaluation process came the #28's second record, the biggest academy session to date. Session One was conducted with 19 recruits by the Academy Instructor, Lieutenant Helen Reyna.

    It is also noteworthy that every single recruit who attended a session and later received their exam, passed it without an issue. In total, 23 graduated recruits were instated on 3 June 2013 during their ceremomy, and at this newsletter's publishing date, four are still undergoing a private session.

    The Training and Recruitment department would like to once again congratulate the graduated recruits of Academy #28.

    #002 - James Whites
    #013 - Gerald Summers
    #018 - Maya White
    #021 - Troy Morse
    #028 - Yuna Aiko
    #037 - Michael Torreto
    #039 - Vik Mondim
    #041 - Dylan Johns
    #042 - Kaleigh Hudson
    #052 - Chuck Pittman
    #053 - Fitzroy Dunn
    #055 - Aleksandra Lazarevic
    #056 - Judas Bonhoeffer
    #057 - Anthony Ramirez
    #058 - Takeshi Ikeda
    #059 - Robert Giovanni
    #060 - Gavrillo Tanelli
    #061 - Brett Kramerman
    #062 - Rodrigo Padilla
    #065 - Mario Luterrazi
    #066 - Elias Silvana
    #067 - Ayden Acosta
    #070 - Nathaniel Brown



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    Image Staff Sergeant > Image Lieutenant
    Robert Caine

    Image Sergeant > Image Staff Sergeant
    Kevin Fields
    Daniel Stokes

    Image Corporal > Image Sergeant
    Theresa Lockhart
    Giovanni Poldilotta
    Benjamin Ross
    Jonathan Delanto

    Image Senior Correction Officer > Image Corporal
    Vivian Freeman
    Amy Johnston

    Image Correction Officer > Image Senior Correction Officer
    Marie Beauchene
    Aurelio Magarelli
    Maritza Nguyen
    Daniel McKane
    Terrance Whitfield

    Remember that if you weren't promoted it doesn't necessarily mean you didn't do well enough. All ranks have a certain time requirement you must fulfill in order to be able to get promoted to it. You can read those requirements in the Handbook section.

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    Golden Lifesaving Award
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    Giovanni Poldilotta


    Silver Lifesaving Award
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    Robert Caine

    Meritious Conduct
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    Giovanni Poldilotta

    Purple Heart
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    Greg Fisher
    Mason Murray
    Amy Johnston

    6 Months Service
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    Helen Reyna
    Angela Havish
    Vivian Freeman

    3 Months Service
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    Benjamin Ross
    Giovanni Poldilotta

    Community Service Training Ribbon
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    Aya Yamaguchi
    Terrance Wright
    Marie Beauchene
    Luca Colei
    Aurellio Magarelli

    Firearms & Tactics Training
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    Aya Yamaguchi
    Leonardo Romani
    Iovis Nero
    Terrance Whitfield
    Aurellio Magarelli



    Rookie of the month, May 2013:

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    The selection process for Rookie of the Month, May 2013 did not go without obstacles. Sergeants and above had to choose from a fairly large selection of promising Correction Officers from Academy #27. At first it seemed like a straightforward task, however recent personal resignations undoubtedly narrowed down the number of candidates. This did not mean that the Correction Officer in question was any worse - merely that the other candidate had different skillsets.

    Due to her tenacity and ability to perform despite violent circumstances, Senior Correction Officer Maritza Nguyen is chosen to be Rookie of the Month, May 2013. Congratulations.

    Employee of the month, May 2013:

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    The Employee of the Month is, under normal circumstances and in almost all cases, given to a member of the department who relentlessly and with great dedication, showed their efforts and their enthusiasm in the last month. Choosing this particular Correctional Officer can be a hard task indeed; many factors are taken into consideration. These can include leadership abilities and heroic actions just to name a few.

    However, we must not forget those who are behind the scenes, but still contribute more than others. These efforts are often, unfortunately, overlooked by department personnel. Staff Sergeants and higher ranks had to choose this month - and they would like to make up for this unfortunate "accident" in their own special way. The employee of the month for May 2013 is Honorary Commissioner Dexter Abbruzi. 40 years of work have not been overlooked.



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    This month it must once again be stressed that the Public Relations unit is not functioning as much as we'd like it to. It experiences a lack of members and while there are enough opportunities for articles, they are not utilized. Should this continue for some time, as it already has, I fear that these newsletters will degrade in quality. We will of course keep publishing them, but I hope that people with a good pen in their hands will take up the challenge and sign up.

    I thank everyone for reading and I hope we are entering a safe and prosperous June, 2013.



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    Galen Hawkins
    Acting Director of Public Relations
    Commissioner


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